Representative and Iraq War Veteran on War and Peace

Representative Tulsi Gabbard (HI) talks about War and Peace and rebuilding our country again.

This is a Veteran I respect and others like her.

 

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Women Who Served During the War in Vietnam

There are many to choose from, but here are a few of our picks. Vietnam Veterans’ Day is March 29th in Wisconsin and a dozen other states. More at tsio.org

Approximately 11,000 American military women were stationed in Vietnam during the war. About 90% were nurses in the Army, Navy, and Air Force. Others served as physicians, physical therapists, personnel in the Medical Service Corps, air traffic controllers, communications specialists, intelligence officers, clerks and in other capacities in different branches of the armed services. Nearly all volunteered. There is no official, accurate record of the number of women who served during Vietnam.
Approximately 11,000 American military women were stationed in Vietnam during the war. About 90% were nurses in the Army, Navy, and Air Force. Others served as physicians, physical therapists, personnel in the Medical Service Corps, air traffic controllers, communications specialists, intelligence officers, clerks and in other capacities in different branches of the armed services. Nearly all volunteered. There is no official, accurate record of the number of women who served during Vietnam. Monument dedicated to the women who served in Vietnam -D.C
Master Sergeant Barbara Jean Dulinsky was a member of the United States Marine Corps who, in 1967, became the first woman United States Marine to serve in a combat zone, when her request to be sent to Vietnam was granted. She served at Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (MACV) Headquarters in Saigon. She died in 1995.
Master Sergeant Barbara Jean Dulinsky was a member of the United States Marine Corps who, in 1967, became the first woman United States Marine to serve in a combat zone, when her request to be sent to Vietnam was granted. She served at Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (MACV) Headquarters in Saigon. She died in 1995. Via:http://marinephotos.togetherweserved.com/
Three U.S. Navy nurses are decorated with purple heart medals in Saigon to become the first American women to receive the medal for service in the Vietnam War at a ceremony on Jan. 7, 1965. The nurses were wounded in an explosion in Hotel Brink in Saigon, Christmas eve. From left are, Lt. Barbara J. Wooster of Laurel, Md.; Lt. Ruth A. Mason of Goshen, N.Y.; and Lt. Ann D. Reynold of Dover, New Hampshire.
hree U.S. Navy nurses are decorated with purple heart medals in Saigon to become the first American women to receive the medal for service in the Vietnam War at a ceremony on Jan. 7, 1965. The nurses were wounded in an explosion in Hotel Brink in Saigon, Christmas eve. From left are, Lt. Barbara J. Wooster of Laurel, Md.; Lt. Ruth A. Mason of Goshen, N.Y.; and Lt. Ann D. Reynold of Dover, New Hampshire. Via:Art.com
Members of the Red Cross Supplemental Recreational Activities Overseas (SRAO) program were commonly referred to as Donut Dollies. Donut Dollies were single, female college graduates who were used primarily as morale boosters for U.S. combat troops in Vietnam.
Members of the Red Cross Supplemental Recreational Activities Overseas (SRAO) program were commonly referred to as Donut Dollies. Donut Dollies were single, female college graduates who were used primarily as morale boosters for U.S. combat troops in Vietnam. Via:cambridgeblog.org
After spending a number of years nursing for the Navy, Kay Bauer requested assignment to Vietnam and arrived there in January 1966. She was part of a Forward Surgical Team assigned to a Vietnamese provincial hospital in Rach Gia, in southernmost South Vietnam. She worked closely with her colleagues, both American and Vietnamese, in a hospital that had no running water or air conditioning.
After spending a number of years nursing for the Navy, Kay Bauer requested assignment to Vietnam and arrived there in January 1966. She was part of a Forward Surgical Team assigned to a Vietnamese provincial hospital in Rach Gia, in southernmost South Vietnam. She worked closely with her colleagues, both American and Vietnamese, in a hospital that had no running water or air conditioning. Via: Sisterhoodofwar.com
Photographer Catherine Leroy - During the Vietnam War, she shot some of the most brutal photographs to come out of the country. Wounded by shrapnel while covering a US Marine unit in the DMZ, she was taken prisoner during the Tet Offensive  by the North Vietnamese Army (NVA), and during her imprisonment, talked the NVA into being photographed. She left the war with post-traumatic stress but kept covering war zones from Northern Ireland, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq and more. She died in 2006
Photographer Catherine Leroy – During the Vietnam War, she shot some of the most brutal photographs to come out of the country. Wounded by shrapnel while covering a US Marine unit in the DMZ, she was taken prisoner during the Tet Offensive by the North Vietnamese Army (NVA), and during her imprisonment, talked the NVA into being photographed. She left the war with post-traumatic stress but kept covering war zones from Northern Ireland, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq and more. She died in 2006. Via: twirlit.com

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