L.C. and L.C.2- Two Gone, Waiting for Number Three

chopper
Credit- echorecon1-5.com

L.C.

“Chicken man is down”

yelled soldier with a grin.

“Hope fucker burns in Hell

places he’s put us in.”

_________________

We had just returned

to gather more supplies.

“L.C.’s chopper is down.”

“The smoke is where it lies.”

_____________________

“Saddle up, move quickly.”

“Catch chopper number one.”

Recon, saddle two through four.”

“Get going guys, have fun.”

_______________________

Up into the midday air

four choppers quickly flew.

Twenty-five of us secured

down chopper and its crew.

_________________________

Pilot with two broken legs.

Co-pilot broken back.

Huey chopper is destroyed

and one L.C. we lack.

Hooray!

(C) John Steinmeyer


L.C.2

Another L.T. Colonel

has come to take the place

of asshole in the chopper

who landed on his face.

___________________________

But this one is so different.

He cares about his men.

He’s got his shit together.

We’re doing good again.

______________________________

Thank God there are no screw ups

like all we had before.

There is no damn distinction

being casualties of war.

________________________________

This L.C.’s a humper.

He comes out in the shit.

But thirty days of humpin’

will get our L.C. hit.

_____________________________________

This time there is sorrow.

We lost a good L.C.

Now we sit and wonder

and wait for number three.

Damn!

(c) John Steinmeyer

  1. Other Side
  2. Sniffer
  3. The Fish
  4. More to Come

John Steinmeyer served in Vietnam as an Infantry Sergeant with the 9th division in the Mekong Delta, then was transferred to the 25th Division and served the last half of his tour in a sniper team.

Thuy Smith’s father (Vietnam Veteran) and Vietnamese mother along with Thuy were friends of John and his family. This will be the first post of a collection of poems that John wrote of his many experiences during his time in Vietnam. The collection is titled – The Rain. Thuy Smith (TSOI) was given permission to share his poems on all of TSOI’s media platforms, etc.


The Fish

Cpl. W.L Files of Charleston, WV, distributes his candy supply amongst these Vietnamese children who were being evacuated from their village near An Hoa on Dec. 19, 1967 during the Vietnam War. (AP Photo)
Credit-Replayphotos.com

The Fish

“G.I, G.I., come to me.”

“I have something to show.”

Ten dow for good Seiko watch.”

Don’t let your buddies know.”


The fish goes to his pocket

and the deal is now through.

Mount up on the deuces,

there are other things to do.


G.I. with new wristwatch

can only sit and smile

of the deal he made today

as he looks at its dial.


Shit, there’s something funny!

It’s painted on by hand.

All its jewels are missing

so he throws it in the sand.


Laughter spins upon him.

His buddies tell him so

the trick is but an old one.

And on to war we go.

(C) John Steinmeyer


More of John’s Poem from his collection titled The rain

  1. Other Side
  2. Sniffer
  3. More to Come

John Steinmeyer served in Vietnam as an Infantry Sergeant with the 9th division in the Mekong Delta, then was transferred to the 25th Division and served the last half of his tour in a sniper team.

Thuy Smith’s father (Vietnam Veteran) and Vietnamese mother along with Thuy were friends of John and his family. This will be the first post of a collection of poems that John wrote of his many experiences during his time in Vietnam. The collection is titled – The Rain. Thuy Smith (TSOI) was given permission to share his poems on all of TSOI’s media platforms, etc.

 


Women Who Served During the War in Vietnam

There are many to choose from, but here are a few of our picks. Vietnam Veterans’ Day is March 29th in Wisconsin and a dozen other states. More at tsio.org

Approximately 11,000 American military women were stationed in Vietnam during the war. About 90% were nurses in the Army, Navy, and Air Force. Others served as physicians, physical therapists, personnel in the Medical Service Corps, air traffic controllers, communications specialists, intelligence officers, clerks and in other capacities in different branches of the armed services. Nearly all volunteered. There is no official, accurate record of the number of women who served during Vietnam.
Approximately 11,000 American military women were stationed in Vietnam during the war. About 90% were nurses in the Army, Navy, and Air Force. Others served as physicians, physical therapists, personnel in the Medical Service Corps, air traffic controllers, communications specialists, intelligence officers, clerks and in other capacities in different branches of the armed services. Nearly all volunteered. There is no official, accurate record of the number of women who served during Vietnam. Monument dedicated to the women who served in Vietnam -D.C
Master Sergeant Barbara Jean Dulinsky was a member of the United States Marine Corps who, in 1967, became the first woman United States Marine to serve in a combat zone, when her request to be sent to Vietnam was granted. She served at Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (MACV) Headquarters in Saigon. She died in 1995.
Master Sergeant Barbara Jean Dulinsky was a member of the United States Marine Corps who, in 1967, became the first woman United States Marine to serve in a combat zone, when her request to be sent to Vietnam was granted. She served at Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (MACV) Headquarters in Saigon. She died in 1995. Via:http://marinephotos.togetherweserved.com/
Three U.S. Navy nurses are decorated with purple heart medals in Saigon to become the first American women to receive the medal for service in the Vietnam War at a ceremony on Jan. 7, 1965. The nurses were wounded in an explosion in Hotel Brink in Saigon, Christmas eve. From left are, Lt. Barbara J. Wooster of Laurel, Md.; Lt. Ruth A. Mason of Goshen, N.Y.; and Lt. Ann D. Reynold of Dover, New Hampshire.
hree U.S. Navy nurses are decorated with purple heart medals in Saigon to become the first American women to receive the medal for service in the Vietnam War at a ceremony on Jan. 7, 1965. The nurses were wounded in an explosion in Hotel Brink in Saigon, Christmas eve. From left are, Lt. Barbara J. Wooster of Laurel, Md.; Lt. Ruth A. Mason of Goshen, N.Y.; and Lt. Ann D. Reynold of Dover, New Hampshire. Via:Art.com
Members of the Red Cross Supplemental Recreational Activities Overseas (SRAO) program were commonly referred to as Donut Dollies. Donut Dollies were single, female college graduates who were used primarily as morale boosters for U.S. combat troops in Vietnam.
Members of the Red Cross Supplemental Recreational Activities Overseas (SRAO) program were commonly referred to as Donut Dollies. Donut Dollies were single, female college graduates who were used primarily as morale boosters for U.S. combat troops in Vietnam. Via:cambridgeblog.org
After spending a number of years nursing for the Navy, Kay Bauer requested assignment to Vietnam and arrived there in January 1966. She was part of a Forward Surgical Team assigned to a Vietnamese provincial hospital in Rach Gia, in southernmost South Vietnam. She worked closely with her colleagues, both American and Vietnamese, in a hospital that had no running water or air conditioning.
After spending a number of years nursing for the Navy, Kay Bauer requested assignment to Vietnam and arrived there in January 1966. She was part of a Forward Surgical Team assigned to a Vietnamese provincial hospital in Rach Gia, in southernmost South Vietnam. She worked closely with her colleagues, both American and Vietnamese, in a hospital that had no running water or air conditioning. Via: Sisterhoodofwar.com
Photographer Catherine Leroy - During the Vietnam War, she shot some of the most brutal photographs to come out of the country. Wounded by shrapnel while covering a US Marine unit in the DMZ, she was taken prisoner during the Tet Offensive  by the North Vietnamese Army (NVA), and during her imprisonment, talked the NVA into being photographed. She left the war with post-traumatic stress but kept covering war zones from Northern Ireland, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq and more. She died in 2006
Photographer Catherine Leroy – During the Vietnam War, she shot some of the most brutal photographs to come out of the country. Wounded by shrapnel while covering a US Marine unit in the DMZ, she was taken prisoner during the Tet Offensive by the North Vietnamese Army (NVA), and during her imprisonment, talked the NVA into being photographed. She left the war with post-traumatic stress but kept covering war zones from Northern Ireland, Somalia, Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq and more. She died in 2006. Via: twirlit.com

Check out a few books

First African American Medal of Honor recipient of the Vietnam War

Milton Lee Olive, III (November 7, 1946 – October 22, 1965) was a United States Army soldier and a recipient of America's highest military decoration — the Medal of Honor — for his actions in the Vietnam War. At the age of 18, Olive sacrificed his life to save others by smothering a live grenade. He was the first African American Medal of Honor recipient of the Vietnam War.

Milton Lee Olive, III (November 7, 1946 – October 22, 1965) was a United States Army soldier and a recipient of America’s highest military decoration — the Medal of Honor — for his actions in the Vietnam War. At the age of 18, Olive sacrificed his life to save others by smothering a live grenade. He was the first African American Medal of Honor recipient of the Vietnam War.

March 25th is also Medal of Honor Day.

In 1993, Congress ordered a study to determine whether racism explained why no black soldier had received the Medal of Honor in World War II. “It was a pretty persuasive document that said yes, in all likelihood, or without doubt, racial discrimination in the Army, in all of the services, ended up creating this imbalance,” Richard Kohn, a former Pentagon executive and one of the researchers, told America Tonight. The study paved the way for other reviews of different groups of minority soldiers overlooked for the military’s highest honor because of politics or prejudice. In 2002, the National Defense Authorization Act ordered the Army to review all of the Jewish and Hispanic soldiers who had received the Distinguished Service Cross from World War II onward, to see if any had deserved the nation’s highest honor. VIA:OriginalPeople.org

Honoring Black Veterans for Black History Month

 February is Black History Month. Honoring our Black American Veterans. 

African American soldiers in World War II
African American Soldiers in World War Two
First African-American woman to achieve rank of major general in U.S. Army inspires many
First African-American woman to achieve rank of major general in U.S. Army inspires many
williamcarney.jpg
Sgt. William H. Carney won the Congressional Medal of Honor for his bravery during the Civil War on July 18, 1863 (the first Black soldier to receive the coveted award). Sargent Carney, a member of the 54th Massachusetts Colored infantry was wounded twice during the charge on Fort Wagner, S.C. while rescuing the Union Flag.
black vet
Henry “Black Death” Johnson. “By the time reinforcements arrived, Johnson had passed out from his wounds. By daylight, the carnage was evident: Johnson had killed four Germans and wounded an estimated 10 to 20 more in a savage hand to hand combat while suffering 21 wounds himself in the fight. Henry Johnson had prevented the Germans from breaking through the French line. He was the first American private to receive the Croix du Guerre, France’s highest military honor for extraordinary valor.
Tuskegee Air Women  Tuskegee Air Women, 1940s. Assigned as weather observers and forecasters, cryptographers, radio operators, repairmen, sheet metal workers, parachute riggers, link trainer instructors, bombsite maintenance specialists, aerial photograph analysts and control tower operators in the Air Corps.
Tuskegee Air Women Tuskegee Air Women, 1940s. Assigned as weather observers and forecasters, cryptographers, radio operators, repairmen, sheet metal workers, parachute riggers, link trainer instructors, aerial photograph analysts and control tower operators in the Air Corps.
Vernon Baker, who was the only living black veteran awarded the Medal of Honor for valor in World War II, receiving it 52 years after he wiped out four German machine-gun nests on a hilltop in northern Italy, died Tuesday at his home near St. Maries, Idaho. He was 90.
Vernon Baker, who was the only living black veteran awarded the Medal of Honor for valor in World War II, receiving it 52 years after he wiped out four German machine-gun nests on a hilltop in northern Italy, died Tuesday at his home near St. Maries, Idaho. He was 90.
Brigadier General Hazel W. Johnson-Brown. The first African American female General and the first Black Chief of the US Army Nursing Corps.
The first African American female General and first African American Chief of the US Army Nursing Corps. Via: Black Art Depot
Who Were the Harlem Hellfighters? -- great read by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. http://www.theroot.com/articles/culture/2013/11/who_were_the_harlem_hellfighters.html
One of the few black combat regiments in World War I Their nickname they’d received from their German foes: “Hellfighters,” the Harlem Hellfighters.

But did you know……………………………

On June 14, 1864 Congress passed an amendment to the Enrollment Act of 1863 calling for equal pay for black and white soldiers. Before this, black soldiers were paid $ 7 per month compared to $ 13 for whites. #TodayInBlackHistory
On June 14, 1864 Congress passed an amendment to the Enrollment Act of 1863 calling for equal pay for black and white soldiers. Before this, black soldiers were paid $ 7 per month compared to $ 13 for whites.

We thank ALL of our Veterans.